/work/vetindex/tasks/simple_ojs_harvester/journals/full_text-html.html
background image

Chiroptera Neotropical 2015 - 21(2): 1342-1346 

1342 

Update on the distribution of Myotis atacamensis (Chiroptera: 

Vespertilionidae): southernmost record and description of its echolocation 

calls 

 

Annia Rodríguez-San Pedro

1,*

, Diego A Peñaranda

2

, Juan Luis Allendes1 & María L.C. Castillo

 

1

  Bioecos  E.I.R.L.,  Manquehue  sur  520,  Oficina  305,  Las  Condes,  Santiago,  Chile.  Programa  para  la 

Conservación  de  los  Murciélagos  de  Chile  (PCMCh),  Departamento  de  Ecología  y  Medio  Ambiente, 
Instituto de Filosofía y Ciencias de la Complejidad, Los Alerces 3024, Ñuñoa, Santiago, Chile. 

2

  Programa  para  la  Conservación  de  los  Murciélagos  de  Chile  (PCMCh),  Departamento  de  Ecología  y 

Medio  Ambiente,  Instituto  de  Filosofía  y  Ciencias  de  la  Complejidad,  Los  Alerces  3024,  Ñuñoa, 
Santiago,  Chile.  Departamento  de  Ciencias  Ecológicas,  Facultad  de  Ciencias,  Universidad  de  Chile, 
Casilla 653. Santiago, Chile. 

 

* Corresponding author: arsanpedro@bioecos.cl 
 

SHORT COMMUNICATION 
Manuscript history: 
Submitted in 5/Aug/2015 
Accepted in 19/Nov/2015 
Available on line in 2/Jan/2016 
Section editor: Maria João R. 
Pereira
 

 
 

Abstract.  Myotis  atacamensis  is  a  vespertilionid  bat  known  from 
western  Peru  to  northern  and  central  Chile,  where  it  is  usually 
associated  with  coastal  deserts.  Here,  we  report  the  southernmost 
record of the species, extending its geographical distribution by 160 
km.  This  represents  the  first  observation  of  M.  atacamensis  in  the 
temperate  sclerophyllous  forest  of  central  Chile,  a  pluviseasonal 
Mediterranean-climate  ecosystem,  suggesting  it  might  not  be 
restricted to arid and semiarid environments, as previously thought. 
We  also  present  the  first  description  of  echolocation  calls  of  this 
understudied species. 
 
Keywords:  Atacaman  Myotis;  Chilean  sclerophyllous  forest;  range 
expansion; acoustic identification 

All Chiroptera Neotropical content can be freely accessed at www.chiroptera.unb.br. ISSN 2317-6105 (online) | 1413-4403 (printed) 

Myotis  Kaup,  1829  is  a  common  and 

widespread 

genus 

of 

vespertilionid 

bats 

represented  by  over  100  species  worldwide 
(Simmons 2005), of which fifteen occur in South 
America  (Larsen  et  al.  2012).  Currently  only  two 
species  are  present  in  Chile:  M.  atacamensis 
(Lataste,  1892)  and  M.  chiloensis  (Waterhouse, 
1840). 

Myotis 

atacamensis

commonly 

called 

Atacaman  Myotis,  is  a  rare  and  understudied  bat, 
restricted  to  south-western  Peru  and  north-central 
Chile  where  it  is  usually  associated  with  coastal 
and  inland  arid  and  semiarid  environments 
(Simmons  2005;  Wilson  2008).    Myotis 
atacamensis
  is  globally  classified  as  Near 
Threatened  by  the  IUCN  (Barquez  &  Díaz  2008) 
because  of  its  strong  dependence  on  habitats  that 
has  become  severely  fragmented.  However,  it  is 
more likely to be classified as “vulnerable” due to 
the  highly  disturbed  status  of  the  sclerophyllous 
forest in the central zone (Vargas-Rodríguez et al. 
2014). In Chile, current known distribution of  M. 
atacamensis
  extends  from  the  province  of 
Tamarugal  (Tarapacá  region,  Latitude  19ºS) 
southward  to  the  province  of  Choapa  (Coquimbo 
region, Latitude 31ºS) (Mann 1978; Wilson 2008; 
Rodríguez-San Pedro et al. 2014). This geographic 
range  is  supported  on  very  few  records,  mostly 
from  the  Atacama  Desert  (Mann  1978;  GBIF 

2014,  see  Appendix)  in  the  northern  hyper-
desertic  tropical  biome  of  the  country, 
characterized  by  extensive  bare  soil  plans,  sand 
dunes, sparse thorny shrublands and relict patches 
of  the  endemic  Tamarugal  forests  (Prosopis 
tamarugo
)  (sensu  Luebert  &  Pliscoff  2006).  In 
contrast,  the  most  recent  record  of  the  species 
comes  from  the  xeric-oceanic  Mediterranean 
bioclimate  in  north-central  Chile,  which  is 
characterized  by  thorny  sclerophyllus  shrubs  and 
succulent  species  (Rodríguez-San  Pedro  et  al. 
2014;  Figure  1).    In  this  note,  we  report  the  first 
occurrence  of  M.  atacamensis  in  temperate 
sclerophyllous  forest  from  central  Chile,  and 
briefly 

comment 

the 

biogeographic 

and 

conservation  implications  of  this  new  record.  We 
also  present  the  first  description  of  the 
echolocation calls of this species. 

Mist-net  sampling  was  conducted  at  the 

Granizo  sector  of  Parque  Nacional  La  Campana 
(32°58′42.40  S,  71°06′48.26  W,  Figure  1),  on 
February  12,  2014.  This  park  constitutes  a 
Biosphere Reserve located in the Coastal Range of 
central  Chile  in  the  Valparaíso  region.  The  study 
area is characterized by a temperate pluviseasonal 
Mediterranean  climate  with  most  rainfall 
concentrated  in  the  winter  season  (Luebert  & 
Pliscoff 2006). The mean annual precipitation and 
temperature  is  about  535.6  mm  and  15°C, 

/work/vetindex/tasks/simple_ojs_harvester/journals/full_text-html.html
background image

San Pedro et al. | Chiroptera Neotropical 2015 - 21(2): 1342-1346 

1343 

respectively  (Mercado  &  Henríquez  1978).  The 
predominant  vegetation  is  represented  by 
deciduous  and  sclerophyllous  forest  tree  species 
(e.  g.  Cryptocarya  alba,  Quillaja  saponaria  and 
Lithrea  caustica)  and  complemented  by  the 
presence  of  hygrophilous  laurel  forest  in  the 

ravines  and  thorny  scrub  in  areas  of  northern 
exposure (Luebert & Pliscoff 2006). 

 
One  male  of  the  Atacaman  Myotis  was 

captured  at  1.5  m  from  the  ground  in  a  mist-net 

placed  across  a  4  m  wide  road  surrounded  by 
sclerophyllous  forest.  The  diagnostic  features  of 
the  specimen  are  in  agreement  with  those 
reported  by  Díaz  et  al.  (2011),  with  a  general 
coloration pale ochraceous, dorsal hairs with dark 
base  and  light  tips  and  a  shorter  forearm  length 
compared  with  its  most  similar  sympatric 
congener 

Myotis 

chiloensis

External 

measurements agree with previous records of the 
species  and  they  were  provide  for  further 
comparisons:  body  weight  (g)  6.0;  total  length 
(mm)  65;  forearm  length  (mm):  37.5;  wingspan 
(mm) 226 (Figure 2). Forearm length in this study 
fall  within  expected  ranges  for  M.  atacamensis 
(Eisenberg  &  Redford  2000;  Galaz  &  Yáñez 
2006;  Rodríguez-San  Pedro  et  al.  2014),  thereby 
supporting  the  identity  of  our  specimen.  The 
individual  was  released  in  the  capture  site  after 
processing. 

Echolocation  calls  were  described  from  five 

hand-released bats (the one captured in this study 
and  four  captured  in  Reserva  Nacional  Las 

 

Figure  2.  Male  Myotis  atacamensis  captured  in  the 
sclerophyllous  forest  at  Parque  Nacional  La  Campana, 
Valparaíso region, central Chile. Photo credits: Daniela 
Lühr.  

 

Figure  1.  Geographic  distribution  of  Myotis  atacamensis  in  Chile  showing  its  occurrence  in  the  bioclimatic  zones 
(map  on  the  left)  and  vegetational  formations  (map  on  the  right)  of  northern  and  central  Chile.  Circles  indicate 
historical records, the square indicates the most recently record of the species (Rodríguez-San Pedro et al. 2014) and 
the triangle indicates the new record at Parque Nacional La Campana, Valparaíso region, central Chile. 

/work/vetindex/tasks/simple_ojs_harvester/journals/full_text-html.html
background image

San Pedro et al. | Chiroptera Neotropical 2015 - 21(2): 1342-1346 

1344 

Chinchillas 31°30′34.14 S, 71°06′23.92 W). Once 
the  bats  were  released  from  the  hand  we  wait 
before  recording  their  echolocation  calls  so  they 
could start emitting more typical searching pulses 
and thus avoid the highly modulated pulses typical 
from  hand-released  bats.  Pulses  were  recorded 
using  an  ultrasound  bat-detector  model  D240X 
(Pettersson  Elektronic  AB,  Upsala,  Sweden)  in 
time-expanded mode, coupled to a digital recorder 
Zoom  H2n  (Zoom  Corporation,  Tokyo,  Japan), 
and  analyzed  with  the  software  Batsound  2.1 
(Pettersson  Elektronic  AB,  Upsala,  Sweden) 
following  Rodríguez-San  Pedro  &  Simonetti 
(2013).  From  each  individual,  two  to  five  pulses 
with  good  signal-to-noise  ratio  were  chosen  for 
analysis.  For  each  pulse,  we  manually  measured 
the  following  parameters:  duration,  initial  and 
final  frequencies,  peak  frequency,  maximal  and 
minimal  frequencies  (measured  20dB  below  peak 
intensity  in  the  power  spectrum)  and  interpulse 

intervals. It has been shown these parameters can 
better explain for acoustic differences between bat 
species  in  Chile  (Rodríguez-San  Pedro  & 
Simonetti 2013). 

Myotis  atacamensis  emits  single  harmonic 

pulses  consisting  of  a  downward  frequency 
modulation at the beginning of the signal followed 
by  a  narrowband  quasi-constant  frequency 
component  (Figure  3A).  Pulses  are  characterized 
by  short  durations  (4.55  ±  0.03  ms)  sweeping 
down  from  about  67  to  43  kHz  and  emitted  at 
interpulse intervals of 124.88 ± 16.35 ms (Table 1; 
Figure  3B).  As  for  other  species  of  Myotis  bats, 
calls of M. atacamensis are characterized by single 
downward  frequency  modulated  pulses.  This  call 
design is regarded as an adaptation for foraging in 
cluttered forest habitats (Schnitzler & Kalko 2001; 
Broders  et  al.  2004;  Rodríguez-San  Pedro  & 
Simonetti  2013).  Similarity  in  call  design  with 
other  congeneric  species  might  lead  to  its 

 

Figure 3. Sonograms of continuous sequence of echolocation calls emitted by Myotis atacamensisA: a typical pulse 
sequence. B: Expanded sonogram of a single call and its power spectrum. 

/work/vetindex/tasks/simple_ojs_harvester/journals/full_text-html.html
background image

San Pedro et al. | Chiroptera Neotropical 2015 - 21(2): 1342-1346 

1345 

misidentification  in  field  due  to  signal  overlap 
between  species;  however,  echolocation  calls  of 
M.  atacamensis  seem  to  differ  from  its  congener 
M. chiloensis
 by its higher final, minimal and peak 
frequencies  (U  =  233.50;  U  =  153.50  and  U  = 
429.00; p ˂ 0.001) (Table 1; Rodríguez-San Pedro 
&  Simonetti  2013).  The  description  of  the 
echolocation  calls  of  M.  atacamensis  provides  a 
basis  for  the  identification  of  the  species  in 
acoustic studies and therefore has the potential to 
contribute  to  a  better  knowledge  of  the  ecology, 
distribution  and  natural  history  of  this  poorly 
known bat species. Because this study is based in 
only  few  echolocation  calls  and  on  a  small  range 
of  different  recording  situations  and  clutters,  we 
must be careful to distinguish Myotis sp. in Chile 
only through acoustics. 

The  specimens  reported  here  extends  the 

known limit of the species distribution by 160 km 
southward  and  represents  the  first  record  of  M. 
atacamensis
 in the temperate sclerophyllous forest 
of  central  Chile,  a  pluviseasonal  Mediterranean 
bioclimate,  providing  evidence  that  the  species  is 
not  restricted  to  arid  and  semiarid  environments, 
as previously thought (Mann 1978; Wilson 2008). 
It  has  been  shown  that  changes  in  land  uses  and 
global  climate  may  result  in  parts  of  the  current 
range  of  a  species  becoming  unsuitable  when 
conditions  change  beyond  those  to  which  the 
species has adapted (Araújo et al. 2006; Lundy et 
al.  2010).  As  a  consequence,  the  distribution  of 
this  species  could  change  to  incorporate  newly 
emerging  suitable  areas.  Myotis  atacamenis  is 
known  to  occur  in  extreme  habitats  (coastal 
deserts) in relation to water availability. Therefore 
the  sclerophyllous  forest  of  central  Chile,  which 
has  a  higher  vegetation  cover  and  more  humid 
environment,  might  be  a  suitable  habitat  for  the 
species.    This  record  also  supports  the  need  of 
conducting  greater  efforts  of  more  systematic 
ecological studies on Chilean bats. Understanding 
the  biogeographic  patterns  of  these  mammals, 
distribution  and  their  potential  changes  under  the 
current  changing  climate  scenario  is  crucial  for 
their management and global species conservation. 

 

Acknowledgements 

We  are  grateful  to  Corporación  Nacional 

Forestal  IV  Region  for  their  assistance  and  for 
granting  permits  to  work  on  the  reserve  and  to 
Daniela Lühr and Francisco Peña for their help in 
fieldwork.  Special  thanks  to  Patricio  Pliscoff  and 
Taryn Fuentes for providing us the geospatial files 
of  the  Chilean  climates  and  vegetation.  We  also 
thank  the  Executive  Editor  and  two  anonymous 
reviewers who provided constructive feedback on 
earlier  drafts  of  the  manuscript.  This  work  was 
supported  by  a  research  grant  from  the  BCI-
RELCOM initiative for the study and conservation 
of bats in Latin-America. IDEA WILD supported 
the Pettersson D240x Bat Detector. 

References  
Araújo  M.B.  &  Rahbek  C.  2006.  How  does 

climate  change  affect  biodiversity?  Science-
New York then Washington, 313 (5792): 1396.  

Barquez R. & Díaz M. 2008. Myotis atacamensis

The  IUCN  Red  List  of  Threatened  Species. 
Version 2015.1; visited 10 Aug 2015, available 
from: http://www.iucnredlist.org.  

Broders  H.G.;  Findlay  C.S.  &  Zheng  L.  2004. 

Effects  of  clutter  on  echolocation  call  structure 
of  Myotis  septentrionalis  and  M.  lucifugus
Journal of Mammalogy, 85(2): 273-281. 

Díaz  M.M.;  Aguirre  L.F.  &  Barquez  R.M.  (eds.). 

2011.  Clave  de  Identificación  de  Los 
Murciélagos  Del  Cono  Sur  de  Sudamérica. 
Cochabamba,  Bolivia:  Centro  de  Estudios  en 
Biología Teórica y Aplicada. 94p. 

Eisenberg,  J.F.  &  K.H.  Redford.  2000.  Mammals 

of the Neotropics, Volume 3: Ecuador, Bolivia, 
Brazil.  Chicago:  University  of  Chicago  Press. 
593 p.  

GBIF.  2014.  Updated  GBIF  Work  Programme 

2014-2016.  Copenhagen:  Global  Biodiversity 
Information  Facility.  Version  2015;  visited  10 
Aug 2015, available from: http://www.gbif.org/ 
resources/2970. 

Galaz, J. L. & J. Yáñez. 2006. Los Murciélagos de 

Chile:  Guía  Para  su  Reconocimiento.  Santiago: 

Table  1.  Summary  statistics  (mean  ±  SE)  of  acoustic  parameters  of  Myotis  atacamensis  in  north-central  Chile.  For 
comparison, published echolocation calls of Myotis chiloensis are shown (Rodríguez-San Pedro and Simonetti 2013).  

 

Myotis atacamensis

Myotis chiloensis

(N = 5 individual bats; 26 

pulses)

(N = 16 individual bats; 66 pulses)

Duration (ms)

4.55 ± 0.03

3.79 ± 0.11

354

˂ 0.001

Initial frequency (kHz)

67.42 ± 1.80

89.29 ± 2.08

243.5

˂ 0.001

Final frequency (kHz)

42.58 ± 0.48

39.26 ± 0.26

233.5

˂ 0.001

Peak frequency (kHz)

50.26 ± 0.71

46.96 ± 0.49

429

˂ 0.001

Maximal frequency (kHz)

62.33 ± 1.23

60.92 ± 1.09

742.5

0.319

Minimal frequency (kHz)

44.81 ± 0.45

40.38 ± 0.33

153.5

˂ 0.001

IPI (ms)

124.88 ± 16.35

95.06 ± 3.62

428

0.137

1, 92

P

/work/vetindex/tasks/simple_ojs_harvester/journals/full_text-html.html
background image

San Pedro et al. | Chiroptera Neotropical 2015 - 21(2): 1342-1346 

1346 

Ediciones  del  Centro  de  Ecología  Aplicada.  80 
p. 

Lataste  F.  1892.  Etudes  sur  la  faune  chilienne. 

II—Note  sur  les  chauve-souris.  Actes  de  la 
Société scientifique du Chile, 1: 70–91. 

Larsen  R.J.;  Knapp  M.C.;  Genoways  H.H.;  Khan 

F.A.A.; Larsen P.A.; Wilson D.E. & Baker R.J. 
2012.  Genetic  diversity  of  neotropical  Myotis 
(Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) with an emphasis 
on  South  American  species.  PloS  one,  7, 
e46578.  

Luebert  F.  &  Pliscoff  P.  (eds.).  2006.  Sinopsis 

bioclimática  y  vegetacional  de  Chile.  Editorial 
Universitaria, Santiago. 316p. 

Lundy  M.;  Montgomery  I.  &  Russ  J.  2010. 

Climate  change

-linked  range  expansion  of 

Nathusius’  pipistrelle  bat,  Pipistrellus  nathusii 
(Keyserling  &  Blasius,  1839).  Journal  of 
Biogeography, 37(12): 2232-2242.  

Mann G. 1978. Los pequeños mamíferos de Chile. 

Gayana, 40: 1–342. 

Mercado  G.V.  &  Henríquez  F.M.  1978.  Informe 

preliminar  de  la  climatología  del  Parque 
Nacional La Campana. Valparaíso: Universidad 
de  Chile.  Facultad  de  Matemáticas  y  Ciencias 
Naturales. 

Montero-Commisso,  F.G.;  Gazzolo  C.  & 

Gonzalez  G.  2008.  Nuevos  registros  de 
quirópteros  para  la  Reserva  Nacional  de 

Paracas, Perú. Ecología Aplicada, 7(1–2): 183–
185. 

Rodríguez-San  Pedro  A.  &  Simonetti  J.A.  2013. 

Acoustic  identification  of  four  species  of  bats 
(Order 

Chiroptera) 

in 

central 

Chile. 

Bioacoustics, 22(2): 165-172. 

Rodríguez-San  Pedro  A.;  Allendes  J.L.;  Castillo 

M.L.C.;  Peñaranda  D.A.  &  Peña-Gómez  F.T. 
2014. Distribution extension and new record of 
Myotis atacamensis (Lataste, 1892) (Chiroptera: 
Vespertilionidae)  in  Chile.  Check  List,  10(5): 
1164-1166. 

Schnitzler H.U. & Kalko E.K. 2001. Echolocation 

by  Insect-Eating  Bats.  Bioscience,  51(7):  557-
569. 

Simmons  N.B.  2005.  Order  Chiroptera.  In: 

Mammal species of the world: a taxonomic and 
geographic reference (edited by Wilson D.E. & 
Reeder  D.M.),  pp.  312–529.  Baltimore,  MD; 
The Johns Hopkins University Press. 

Vargas-Rodríguez  R.;  Rodríguez-San  Pedro  A.  &  

Peñaranda D. 2014. Myotis atacamensis. Fichas 
de  evaluación  de  murciélagos  para  la  IUCN. 
Version  2015;  visited  10  Aug  2015,  available 
from: 

http://www.globalmammalforum.org/ 

myotis-atacamensis/. 

Wilson  D.E.  2008.  [2007].  Genus  Myotis.  In: 

Mammals of South America, vol. 1, marsupials, 
xenarthrans, shrews and bats (edited by Gardner 
A.),  pp.  468–481.  Chicago  and  London:  The 
University of Chicago Press. 

Appendix 

Localities of the occurrence points shown in the Figure 1, plus the record presented herein. Occurrences are arranged 
from  north  to  south.  Geographic  site  names  are  as  follow:  Country,  locality  and  coordinates  in  decimal  degrees. 
Collector  or  observer  names  and  year  of  record  are  given  in  parentheses.  Data  were  downloaded  from  the  GBIF 
(2014) data base, except *.  
Locality 

Coordinates 

Source 

Peru, Olmos 

-5.849750° S, -79.824810° W 

Graham, Gary L. 1978; Barkley, Lynn J. 1978; 
Warner R.M. 1984 

Peru, Cerro la Vieja, Motupe, 

-6.20° S, -79.683° W 

Barkley, Lynn J. 1981 

Peru, Bujama Baja 

-12.713816° S, -76.633046° W 

Short, L.L. Jr. 1968 

*Peru, Reserva Nacional 
Paracas  

-13.84° S, -76.20° W 

Montero-Comisso et al. 2008 

Peru, Puquio  

-14.61699° S, -74.33921° W 

Myrnal Leong 1969 

Peru, Patasagua, Tiabaya  

-16.45° S, -71.600° W 

 

Peru, Chucarapi, Tambo Valley  
 

-17.07083° S, -71.72195° W 

Koford C.B. 1952 

Chile, Miñimiñi  

-19.182105° S, -69.68458° W 

Mann W. & Mann S. 1944 

Chile, Huara  

-19.9833° S, -69.7833° W 

 

Chile, Pozo Almonte  

-20.2667° S, -69.800° W 

 

Chile, Los Canchones  

-20.45° S, -69.616667° W 

 

Chile 

-21.149607° S, -69.374403° W 

Ossa Gomez G. 

Chile, Paihuano  

-30.016667° S, -70.533333° W 

C. Sanborn C. 1923 

*Chile, Illapel, RN Las 
Chinchillas  

-31.509483° S, -71.106644° W 

Rodríguez-San Pedro et al. 2014 

Chile, Olmué, PN La 
Camapana  

-32.978445° S, -71.113406° W 

This study 

 

 

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.





Chiroptera Neotropical
 
Universidade de Brasília
Campus Darcy Ribeiro
Instituto de Ciências Biológicas - Departamento de Zoologia
CEP: 70910-900 - Brasilia - DF
Tel: (+55 61) 3107-2915
Fax: (+55 61) 3107-2922
 
chiropteraneotropical@gmail.com
http://chiropteraneotropical.net.