/work/vetindex/tasks/simple_ojs_harvester/journals/full_text-html.html
background image

Chiroptera Neotropical 2015 - 21(2): 1332-1337 

1332 

Phyllostomid bats and their diets at Urucum Massif, Mato Grosso do Sul, 

Brazil 

 

Grasiela Porfirio

1,*

 & Marcelo Oscar Bordignon

 

1

 Universidade Católica Dom Bosco, Campo Grande, MS. 

2

 Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS. 

 

* Corresponding author: grasi_porfirio@hotmail.com 
 

ARTICLE 
Manuscript history: 
Submitted in 21/Apr/2015 
Accepted in 15/Aug/2015 
Available on line in 27/Dec/2015 
Section editor: Maria João R. 
Pereira
 

 
 

Abstract. Frugivorous bats are important components of the natural 
environment since they perform essential roles in the maintenance of 
ecosystems,  such  as  seed  dispersal  and  the  pollination  of  several 
plant  species.  This  study  aimed  to  describe  the  diversity  of  the 
Family Phyllostomidae and the diet of these bats at Urucum Massif 
in the municipality of Corumbá, Mato Grosso do Sul. Captures were 
carried  out  using  mist  nets,  from  April  to  September  2004,  in 
different vegetation types found within the study area. The captured 
bats were placed in individual cotton bags where they were allowed 
to defecate. The collected feces were washed and treated before their 
contents  were  identified  using  specialized  keys.  Bats  were  released 
back at their respective capture points on the night following capture. 
A  total  of  83  bats  belonging  to  nine  species  of  the  Family 
Phyllostomidae  were  captured.  The  most  abundant  phyllostomids 
were  Platyrrhinus  lineatus,  Carollia  perspicillata  and  Artibeus 
lituratus
. The most frequently consumed plants were represented by 
three  families  that  are  considered  pioneer  species:  Cecropiaceae, 
Piperaceae  and  Moraceae.  Since  the  study  site  is  strongly  impacted 
by mining activities, we recommend special attention be given to the 
conservation of bats that occur in the region due to their contribution 
to the regeneration of areas degraded by mining. 
 
Key words: Frugivory; Pantanal; Phyllostomidae 
 

All Chiroptera Neotropical content can be freely accessed at www.chiroptera.unb.br. ISSN 2317-6105 (online) | 1413-4403 (printed) 

Introduction 

Bats  constitute  one  of  the  most  important 

orders  of  mammals  in  tropical  forests, 
representing  approximately  40%  of  mammal 
species recorded in these regions (Emmons & Feer 
1990).  In  Brazil,  approximately  25%  of  mammal 
species  belong  to  the  order  Chiroptera,  of  which 
currently  there  are  nine  registered  families  and 
172 recorded species (Reis et al. 2011). 

Among mammals, Chiroptera is well known as 

one  of  the  most  important  plant  dispersal  groups 
(Van  Der  Pijl  1957;  Uieda  &  Vasconcellos-Neto 
1985; Marinho Filho & Vasconcellos-Neto 1994). 
It  is  estimated  that  approximately  30%  of  all  bat 
species rely on plants as a food resource, acting as 
dispersers  for  almost  130  genera  of  tropical  and 
subtropical plants (Feldhamer et al. 1999). Family 
Phyllostomidae  is  the  most  speciose  family  of 
Neotropical  fruit  bats  (Uieda  &  Vasconcellos-
Neto  1985).  Fruit  bats  act  as  pollinators  and  help 
in  forest  regeneration  through  seed  dispersal 
(Emmons  &  Feer  1990).  Due  to  their  mobility, 
these animals can travel long distances, spreading 

a  large  number  of  seeds  over  a  wide  area  with 
potential  for  germination  (Sato  et  al.  2008; 
Martins  et  al.  2014),  thereby  enabling  the 
regeneration  of  degraded  areas  (Muller  &  Reis 
1992).  

In  Brazil,  most  studies  on  diet  and  seed 

dispersal by fruit bats come from the southeast of 
the country (Silva & Peracchi 1999; Passos 2003; 
Passos  &  Passamani  2003;  Sato  et  al.  2008). 
Overall,  knowledge  about  mammals  occurring  in 
Pantanal  is  still  considered  limited  (Rodrigues  et 
al. 2002; Alho et al. 2011). Little is known about 
the  bats  and  their  diets  in  this  biome  (but  see 
studies carried out by Teixeira et al. 2009; Munin 
et  al.  2011;  Munin  et  al.  2012  and  Corrêa  et  al. 
2014).  In  the  Urucum  Massif,  bat  surveys  have 
been  carried  out  by  Bordignon  &  França  (2004, 
2009).  

The Urucum Massif is one of the few elevated 

areas  in  the  Pantanal  biome  (Alfonsi  &  Camargo 
1986).  The  region  presents  unique  characteristics 
due  to  the  influences  of  neighboring  ecosystems 
such  as  the  Chaco  and  Chiquitana  Forest  and  its 
levels  of  endemism  (Tomas  et  al.  2010).  The 

/work/vetindex/tasks/simple_ojs_harvester/journals/full_text-html.html
background image

Porfirio & Bordignon | Chiroptera Neotropical 2015 - 21(2): 1332-1337 

1333 

Urucum Massif is also one of the most important 
areas  of  iron  and  manganese  mining  in  Brazil 
(Tomas et al. 2010). Taking into consideration that 
its  biodiversity  is  poorly  known  (Bordignon  & 
França 2009; Tomas et al. 2010) and that impacts 
related to the expansion of mining activities, rural 
settlements  and  agriculture,  as  well  as  the  urban 
growth of Corumbá and Ladário are increasing, it 
is    urgent  to  study  animal  and  plant  populations. 
This  is  particularly  important  because  some  may 
have an increased risk of local extinction (Tomas 
et al. 2010).  Due to the ecological importance of 
the Urucum Massif, studies of the diet of fruit bats 
in  this  region,  which  are  still  lacking,  can 
contribute significantly to our understanding of the 
dynamics  of  its  bat  and  plant  communities,  and 
support  local  conservation  actions.  Here,  we 
investigate  the  diversity  of  phyllostmid  bats  and 
their diets in the Urucum Massif, Brazil.  

Material and Methods 

The  study  was  carried  out  at  Corumbaense 

Reunida  S.  A.  Mining,  located  in  the  Urucum 
Massif,  south  of  Corumbá,  in  the  state  of  Mato 
Grosso  do  Sul.  The  Urucum  Massif  is  an 
important  reserve  of  iron  and  manganese,  located 
in  the  Santa  Cruz  geological  formation,  on  the 
western  border  of  the  Pantanal  (Okida  &  Anjos 
2000). The altitude of the Massif ranges from 120 
to 1095 meters, standing up to most of the region 
which  has  an  average  elevation  of  100  to  200 
meters over the sea level (Silva & Abdon 1988). 

The climate is seasonal, with two well-defined 

seasons – the rainy season from October to March, 
where  the  average  temperature  ranges  from  26-
28ºC, and the dry season from April to September, 
where  the  temperature  ranges  between  21-25ºC. 
The  coldest  peak  is  reached  in  June  and  July 
(Alfonsi  &  Camargo  1986).  Main  vegetation 
groups  are    Seasonal  Semidecidual  Forest, 
Seasonal  Decidual  Forest  and,  to  a  lesser  extent, 
Cerrado and Chaco (Pott et al. 2000). 

Bat  captures  were  carried  out  monthly  from 

April  to  September  in  2004,  comprising  three 
nights of sample effort at four points with different 
vegetation  types:  P1  (19

12’34,7”  S  57

33’43,8” 

W; 

Seasonal 

Semidecidual 

Forest), 

P2 

(19

11’51,7” S 57

34’20,6” W; Seasonal Decidual 

Forest),  P3  (19

12’34,7”  S  57

33’43,8”  W; 

Seasonal 

Semidecidual 

Forest), 

and 

P4 

(19

17’59,7”  S  57

35’11,7”  W;  Riparian  forest). 

At  dusk,  two  mist  nets  of  2.6  x  9  meters  were 
opened  for  a  period  of  four  hours  and  were 
checked every 10 minutes.  

Captured bats were placed in individual cotton 

bags to defecate (Sarmento et al. 2014), and taken 
to  the  Zoology  Laboratory  at  the  Federal 
University of Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS). In the 
lab,  the  animals  were  identified  using  specific 
literature (e.g. Vizotto & Taddei 1973; Emmons & 
Feer  1997;  Reis  et  al.  2011).  They  were  released 
the  following  night  in  the  same  place  where  they 
were captured.  

Diet  was  analyzed  by  examining  seed-

containing feces (Martins et al. 2014), which were 
washed in plastic sieves of 1 mm mesh and dried 
in  petri  dishes  with  70%  alcohol  solution.  After 
drying,  seeds  were  identified  by  comparison  to 
seeds  of  a  reference  collection  established  from 
botanical  material  of  the  Urucum  Massif  and  its 
surroundings  available  at  Herbarium  COR 
(UFMS, Corumbá).  

We  calculated  the  frequency  of  occurrence  of 

the  bats  species  captured  and  the  total  number  of 
seeds  found  in  their  feces.  The  capture  effort  for 
bats was calculated as m

2

 x total hours of exposure 

of mist nets x number of nights x number of mist 
nets  used,  where  m

2

=  net  length  x  net  height 

(Aguirre 2002). 

Results 

With  a  total  effort  of  1,470.6  h.m

2

,  we 

captured  83  bats  from  nine  species  of 
Phyllostomid  bats.  Majority  were  males  (55.4%), 

Table  1.  Species  of  phyllostomid  bats  captured  in  the  area  of  Corumbaense  Reunida  S.  A. 
Mining,  Urucum  Massif,  from  April  to  September  2004,  their  feeding  guilds,  number  of 
captures and relative frequency (Fr%). 

 

Species

Guild

No. captures

Fr%

Platyrrhinus lineatus (Peters, 1866)

Frugivore

26

31.3

Carollia perspicillata (Linnaeus, 1758)

Frugivore

16

19.2

Artibeus lituratus (Olfers, 1818)

Frugivore

15

18

Artibeus planirostris (Spix, 1823)

Frugivore

10

12

Chiroderma doriae (O. Thomas, 1891)

Frugivore

7

8.4

Glossophaga soricina (Pallas, 1766)

Nectarivore

6

7.2

Phyllostomus elongatus (E. Geoffroy, 1810)

Omnivorous

1

1.2

Phyllostomus hastatus (Pallas, 1767)

Frugivore

1

1.2

Lophostoma silvicolum (d’Orbigny, 1836)

Insectivorous

1

1.2

Total

83

100%

/work/vetindex/tasks/simple_ojs_harvester/journals/full_text-html.html
background image

Porfirio & Bordignon | Chiroptera Neotropical 2015 - 21(2): 1332-1337 

1334 

and  the  most  abundant  frugivores  were 
Platyrrhinus 

lineatus 

(n=26), 

Carollia 

perspicillata (n=16) and Artibeus lituratus (n=15) 
(Table  1).  We  obtained  53  fecal  samples  from 
bats, of which 39 had seeds from three families of 
plants: Cecropiaceae, Piperaceae and Moraceae. In 
14 samples we only found pulp fruit in the feces. 
The  single  individual  of  Lophostoma  silvicolum 
(Table 1) did not defecate in the cotton bag. 

We found seeds in the feces of four species of 

bats:  Artibeus  lituratus,  Artibeus  planirostris
Carollia  perspicilata,  and  Platyrrhinus  lineatus 
(Table  2).  We  only  found  seeds  of  Cecropia 
pachystachya
  and  Ficus  sp.  in  the  feces  of 
Platyrrhinus lineatus

 

Discussion and Conclusion 

The  species  of  bats  captured  in  the  Urucum 

Massif  represented  21%  of  the  Family 
Phyllostomidae  and  11%  of  the  bat  species 
reported for the Pantanal according to Alho et al. 
(2011). However, according to a recent inventory 
and taxonomic update by Paglia et al. (2012), this 
increases  to  30%  of  the  Phyllostomidae  and  15% 
of bat species registered for the biome.  

Although  our  objective  was  primarily  to 

investigate the diversity of Phyllostomid bats and 
their  diets,  the  fact  that  no  other  families  of  bats 
were  represented  in  our  surveys  is  noteworthy. 
According  to  Passos  et  al.  (2003),  this  may  be 
related  to  the  fact  that  insectivorous  bats  such  as 
species  of  the  Vespertilionidae  and  Mollossidae 
families tend to avoid mistnets. 

In a year-long study carried out at the Urucum 

Massif, Bordignon & França (2004) also observed 
nine species of Phyllostomidae, during which only 
four  species  accounted  for  91%  of  the  total 
captures:  A.  planirostris,  A.  lituratus,  P.  lineatus 
and  C.  perspicillata.  This  indicates  that  our 
survey, despite only being undertaken over a small 
portion  of  the  year,  represents  a  good 
approximation  of  species  composition  for  this 
family  at  the  Urucum  Massif.  Regarding 
composition,  our  results  are  similar  to  those 
reported  by  Martins  et  al.  (2014)  who  found  that 

species such as C. perspicilataA. planirostris and 
A. lituratus were the most abundant phyllostomid 
bat  species  in  the  Cerrado  of  Bandeirantes  (Mato 
Grosso do Sul). 

We observed that the recorded bat species have 

a  potentially  significant  role  as  seed  dispersers  in 
the  Massif  Urucum.  Fruits  of  the  pioneer  plant 
species  C.  pachystachya  represented  70%  of  the 
diet of one of the most abundant bats, P. lineatus
Sato et al. (2008) found that this species of bat is 
an  important  consumer  and  seed  disperser  of  this 
pioneer  species  at  the  Itirapina  Experimental 
Station  (São  Paulo),  while  others  have  also 
reported  the  importance  of  the  plant  in  the  P. 
lineatus 
diet such as Pedro & Taddei (1997) in the 
state  of  Minas  Gerais  and  Passos  et  al.  (2003)  in 
Intervales  Park,  São  Paulo  for  P.  recifinus
Nevertheless, Munin et al. (2011) also reported the 
consumption of fig trees by these bats in Pantanal, 
which  may  exhibits  different  rates  of  ingestion 
between species of figs (Ficus sp.). 

Specimens  of  C.  perspicillata  mainly 

consumed  fruits  of  Piper  sp.  corroborating  data 
from  other  areas  where  it  was  observed  that  this 
species  of  bat  specializes  in  the  consumption  of 
fruit  from  this  plant  (Marinho-Filho  1991; 
Charles-Dominique  1991;  Mello  2002;  Munin  et 
al.  2012;  Martins  et  al.  2014).  Both  A.  lituratus 
and  A.  planirostris  had  diets  based  on  fruits  of 
Ficus  sp.  and  C.  pachystachia.  According  to 
Terborgh (1986), fig trees are an important source 
of food for frugivores, especially during periods of 
food  shortage  such  as  the  dry  season  when  our 
surveys  were  mostly  undertaken.  Fleming  (1986) 
highlighted  that  A.  lituratus  is  a  specialist  in  the 
consumption  of  fruits  of  the  Family  Moraceae. 
Bats of the genus Artibeus have fast rates of food 
passage  and  digestion  of  these  fruits  in  the 
digestive  tract  and  are  considered  excellent 
dispersers,  spreading  seeds  far  from  the  parent 
plant  (August  1981;  Fleming  &  Heithaus,  1981; 
Coates-Estrada & Estrada 1986). 

We  did  not  find  any  seeds  in  the  other  feces 

analyzed, which consisted only on fruit pulp, from 
which we could not distinguish species. Although 
it  is  expected  a  reduction  in  the  availability  of 

Table 2. Species of plants found in the feces of bats captured in the area of Corumbaense Reunida 
S.  A.  Mining,  Urucum  Massif,  from  April  to  September  2004.  Al  =  Artibeus  lituratus;  Ap  = 
Artibeus planirostris; Cp = Carollia perspicilata; Pl = Platyrrhinus lineatus

 

Plant species

Al

Ap

Cp

Pl

Total

Cecropiaceae
Cecropia pachystachya 

2

3

2

16

23

Moraceae
Ficus sp. 

3

1

0

7

11

Piperaceae
Piper sp. 

0

0

5

0

5

Total

5

4

7

23

39

/work/vetindex/tasks/simple_ojs_harvester/journals/full_text-html.html
background image

Porfirio & Bordignon | Chiroptera Neotropical 2015 - 21(2): 1332-1337 

1335 

fruits  in  the  dry  season  and  consequently  a  more 
generalist  diet  in  the  bats  of  the  Pantanal  during 
this  season  (Munin  et  al.  2012),  the  phyllostmid 
species  of  this  study  were  still  using  other  fruits 
available.    Nevertheless,  the  low  number  of 
samples  analyzed  and  the  limited  time  dedicated 
to  this  study  did  not  enable  us  to  describe  a 
specialization  in  the  feeding  habits  of  the  bats  of 
Urucum. 

The  low  occurrence  of  seed-containing  feces 

may  be  related  to  the  possibility  that  bats  were 
captured  before  they  ate.  The  time  at  which  our 
mist  nets  were  deployed  was  similar  to  that 
reported  in  other  studies  such  as  Passos  & 
Passamani  (2003),  who  also  kept  their  nets  open 
for a period of four hours just after dusk. Thus, it 
is likely that most of the bats were captured before 
feeding  for  that  nights  had  commenced  and  near 
their shelters. 

Overall,  the  plant  species  dispersed  by  bats, 

such as those identified in this study, have similar 
characteristics such as falling leaves and fruits that 
are dull-colored, often having an unpleasant odor, 
easily  accessible  and  with  a  high  sugar 
concentration  (Van  der  Pijl  1957;  Avelino  et  al. 
2003),  equating  to  the  quiropterocory  syndrome 
(Howe  &  Wetsley  1986).  The  seeds  identified  in 
the feces collected from our specimens are known 
to be the food of bats and some bird species, and 
are  classified  as  pioneering,  fast-growing,  and 
relatively  frequent  in  the  forested  regions  of  the 
Pantanal (Pott & Pott 1994). 

Despite  the  low  diversity  of  plant  species 

found  in  our  dietary  sampling,  we  wish  to 
highlight  the  importance  of  the  consumption  of 
pioneer  species  such  as  these  that  assist  in  the 
regeneration and succession process in deforested 
areas  (Muller  &  Reis  1992;  Medellin  &  Gaona 
1999). In this context, these bats are vital partners 
in  the  recovery  of  areas  that  have  been  degraded 
by  mining  activities  and,  for  this  reason,  mining 
companies  should  be  willing  to  collaborate  with 
other stakeholders to conserve the bat species that 
inhabit  the  Urucum  Massif,  as  well  as  their 
habitats.   

The  results  of  this  study  provide  important 

information about the occurrence of species of the 
Family  Phyllostomidae  in  a  scarcely  studied 
region  on  the  western  edge  of  the  Brazilian 
Pantanal, as well as information about their diets, 
which  appear  to  be  based  on  pioneer  plants.  Due 
to  their  ecological  role  as  seed  dispersers,  it  is 
crucial that other surveys and dietary studies of the 
Family  Phyllostomidae  be  undertaken  to  evaluate 
the  current  impact  of  mining  activities  in  the 
Urucum  Massif,  as  well  as  investigations  of  the 
availability  and  seasonality  of  food  resources  in 
the Pantanal in order to increase knowledge and to 
support conservation actions.  

Acknowledgements 

We  are  thankful  to  Mineração  Corumbaense 

Reunida  S.  A.  and  UFMS  (Federal  University  of 
Mato  Grosso  do  Sul,  Campus  do  Pantanal)  for 
logistic  support.  Animals  were  captured  under 
license 10303-1 from ICMBio. 

References 
Aguirre  L.F.  2002.  Structure  of  a  Neotropical 

savana bat community. Journal do Mammalogy 
83: 775-784. 

Alfonsi R.R. & Camargo M.B.P. 1986. Condições 

climáticas  para  a  região  do  Pantanal 
Matogrossense.  I  Simpósio  sobre  recursos 
naturais  e  sócio-econômicos  do  Pantanal. 
Embrapa, Brasília, pp. 29-42. 

Alho  C.J.R.;  Camargo  G.  &  Fischer  E.    2011. 

Terrestrial  and  aquatic  mammals  of  the 
Pantanal. Brazilian Journal of Biology 71: 297-
310. 

August  P.  1981.  Fig  consumption  and  seed 

dispersal  by  Artibeus  jamaicensis  in  the  llanos 
of Venezuela. Biotropica 13: 70-76. 

Avelino  A.S.;  Pizzato  L.;  Santos  C.F.;  Di  Napoli 

R.P. & Améndola M. 2003. Dispersão de Ficus 
sp.  por  morcegos  em  baía  da  Fazenda  Campo 
Dora, Pantanal da Nhecolândia. In: Ecologia do 
Pantanal:  curso  de  campo  2003  (edited  by 
Corrêa  C.E.;  Rodrigues  L.C.;  Cavallaro  R.M.; 
Raizer  J.  &  Marques  M.R.),  pp  97-99.  Editora 
UFMS, Campo Grande.   

Bordignon  M.O.  &  França  A.O.  2004.  Análise 

preliminar  sobre  a  diversidade  de  morcegos  no 
Maciço do Urucum, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brasil. 
IV  Simpósio  sobre  os  recursos  naturais  e 
socioeconômicos  do  Pantanal.  Embrapa-
Pantanal,  pp.  95-101.  Editora  Embrapa, 
Corumbá. 

Bordignon  M.O.  &  França  A.O.  2009.  Riqueza, 

diversidade  e  variação  altitudinal  em  uma 
comunidade 

de 

morcegos 

filostomídeos 

(Mammalia:  Chiroptera)  no  Centro-Oeste  do 
Brasil. Chiroptera Neotropical 15: 425-433. 

Charles-Dominique P. 1991. Feeding strategy and 

activity budget of the frugivourous bat Carollia 
perspicillata
  (Chiroptera-Phyllostomidae)  in 
French  Guiana.  Journal  of  Tropical  Ecology  7: 
243-256. 

Coastes-Estrada  R.  &  Estrada  A.  1986.  Fruiting 

and  frugivores  at  a  strangler  fig  in  the  tropical 
rainforest  of  Los  Tuxtlas,  Mexico.  Journal  of 
Tropical Ecology 2: 349-357. 

Côrrea  C.E.;  Teixeira  R.C.  &  Fischer  E.A.  2014. 

Com  ajuda  de  morcegos,  a  embaúba  abraça  o 
acuri no Pantanal. Ciência Pantanal 1: 32-34. 

Emmons  L.H.  &  Feer  F.  1990.  Neotropical 

rainforest mammals: a field guide. University of 
Chicago Press, Chicago. 

/work/vetindex/tasks/simple_ojs_harvester/journals/full_text-html.html
background image

Porfirio & Bordignon | Chiroptera Neotropical 2015 - 21(2): 1332-1337 

1336 

Emmons  L.H.  &  Feer  F.  1997.  Neotropical 

rainforest mammals: a field guide. University of 
Chicago Press, Chicago. 

Feldhamer G.A.; Drickamer L.C.; Vessey S.H. & 

Merritt  J.F.    1999.  Mammalogy:  adaptation, 
diversity  and  ecology.  McGraw-Hill,  New 
York.  

Fleming 

T.H. 

Heithaus 

E.R. 

1981. 

Frugivourous  bats,  seed  shadows,  and  the 
structure  of  tropical  forests.  Biotropica  13:  45-
53.  

Fleming  T.H.  1986.  Opportunism  versus 

specialization: evolution of feeding strategies in 
frugivorous  bats.  In:  Frugivores  and  seed 
dispersal  (edited  by  Estrada  A.  &  Fleming 
T.H.),  pp.  105-118.  Dr.  Junk  W  Publisher, 
Dordrecht.  

Howe  H.F.  &  Westley  L.C.  1986.  Ecology  of 

pollination and seed dispersal. In: Plant Ecology 
(edited  by  Crawley  M.J),  pp.  185-215. 
Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford.  

Martins  M.P.V.;  Torres  J.M.  &  Anjos  E.A.C. 

2014.  Dieta  de  morcegos  frugívoros  em 
remanescentes  de  Cerrado  em  Bandeirantes, 
Mato Grosso do Sul. Biotemas 27: 129-135.  

Marinho-Filho  J.S.  1991.  The  coexistence  of  two 

frugivorous  bat  species  and  the  phenology  of 
their  food  plants  in  Brazil.  Journal  of  Tropical 
Ecology 7: 59-67. 

Marinho-Filho  J.  &  Vasconcellos-Neto  J.  1994. 

Dispersão  de  sementes  de  Vismia  cayennensis 
(Jacq.)  Pers.  (Guttiferae)  por  morcegos  na 
região  de  Manaus,  Amazonas.  Acta  Botanica 
Brasiliensis 8: 87-96. 

Medellin  R.A.  &  Gaona  O.  1999.  Seed  dispersal 

by  bats  and  birds  in  forests  and  disturbed 
habitats  of  Chiapas,  Mexico.  Biotropica  31: 
478-485. 

Mello  M.A.R.  2002.  Interações  entre  morcego 

Carollia 

perspicillata 

(Linnaeus, 

1758) 

(Chiroptera:  Phyllostomidae)  e  plantas  do 
gênero  Piper  (Linnaeus,  1737)  (Piperales: 
Piperaceae)  em  uma  área  de  Mata  Atlântica. 
Master Dissertation, Universidade do Estado do 
Rio de Janeiro.  

Muller  M.F.  &  Reis  N.R.  1992.  Partição  de 

recursos  alimentares  entre  quatro  espécies  de 
morcegos 

frugívoros 

(Chiroptera, 

Phyllostomidae). Revista Brasileira de Zoologia 
9: 345-355. 

Munin  R.L.;  Costa  P.C.  and  Fischer  E.A.  2011. 

Differential  ingestion  of  fig  seeds  by  a 
Neotropical 

bat 

Platyrrhinus 

lineatus

Mammalian Biology 76: 772-774.  

Munin  R.L.;  Fischer  E.A.  &  Gonçalves  F.  2012. 

Food  habits  and  dietary  overlap  in  a 

Phyllostomid bat assemblage in the Pantanal of 
Brazil. Acta Chiropterologica 14: 195-204. 

Okida R. & Anjos C.E. 2000. Geomorfologia. In: 

Zoneamento  Ambiental,  borda  do  oeste  do 
Pantanal,  Maciço  do  Urucum  e  Adjacências 
(edited  by  Silva  J.S.V.),  pp.  47-53.  Editora 
Embrapa, Brasília.   

Paglia  A.P.;  Fonseca  G.A.B.;  Rylands  A.B.; 

Herrmann  G.;  Aguiar  L.M.S.;  Chiarello  A.G.; 
Leite  Y.L.R.;  Costa  L.P.;  Siciliano  S.;  Kierulff 
M.C.M.; 

Mendes 

S.L.; 

Tavares 

V.C.; 

Mittermeier R.A. & Patton J.L. 2012. Annotated 
Checklist  of  Brazilian  Mammals.  Conservation 
International, Arlington. 

Passos  F.C.;  Silva  W.R.;  Pedro  W.A.  &  Bonin 

M.R. 

2003. 

Frugivoria 

em 

morcegos 

(Mammalia,  Chiroptera)  no  Parque  Estadual 
Intervales,  sudeste  do  Brasil.  Revista  Brasileira 
de Zoologia 20: 511-517.  

Passos  J.G.  &  Passamani  M.  2003.  Artibeus 

lituratus  (Chiroptera,  Phyllostomidae):  biologia 
e dispersão de sementes no Parque do Museu de 
Biologia  Prof.  Mello  Leitão.  Natureza  On  Line 
1: 1-6. 

Pedro  W.A.  &  Taddei  V.A.  1997.  Taxonomic 

assemblage  of  bats  from  Panga  Reserve, 
Southeastern  Brazil:  abundance  patterns  and 
trophic  relations  in  the  Phyllostomidae 
(Chiroptera).  Boletim  do  Museu  de  Biologia 
Mello Leitão 6: 3-21.  

Pott  A.  &  Pott  V.J.  1994.  Plantas  do  Pantanal. 

Editora Embrapa, Brasília.  

Pott A.; Da Silva J.S.; Salis S.M.; Pott V.J. & Da 

Silva M.P. 2000. Vegetação e uso da terra.  In: 
Zoneamento  Ambiental,  borda  do  oeste  do 
Pantanal,  Maciço  do  Urucum  e  Adjacências 
(edited  by  Silva  J.S.V.),  pp.  211.  Editora 
Embrapa, Brasília.  (REIS, N. R.; Peracchi A.L.; 
Pedro  W.A.  &  Lima  I.P.  2011.  Mamíferos  do 
Brasil. Nelio R. dos Reis, Londrina. 

Rodrigues  F.H.G.;  Medri  I.M.;  Tomas  W.M.  & 

Mourão  G.  2012.  Revisão  do  conhecimento 
sobre ocorrência e distribuição de mamíferos do 
Pantanal. Documentos 38: 1-41. 

Sarmento R.; Alves-Costa C.P.; Ayub A. & Mello 

M.A.R.  2014.  Partitioning  of  seed  dispersal 
services between birds and bats in a fragment of 
the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. Zoologia 31: 245-
255.  

Sato  T.M.;  Passos  F.C.  &  Nogueira  A.C.  2008. 

Frugivoria 

de 

morcegos 

(Mammalia, 

Chiroptera) 

em 

Cecropia 

pachystachya 

(Urticaceae)  e  seus  efeitos  na  germinação  das 
sementes.  Papéis  Avulsos  de  Zoologia  48:  19-
26.  

/work/vetindex/tasks/simple_ojs_harvester/journals/full_text-html.html
background image

Porfirio & Bordignon | Chiroptera Neotropical 2015 - 21(2): 1332-1337 

1337 

Silva J.S.V. & Abdon M.M. 1988. Delimitação do 

pantanal  brasileiro  e  suas  sub-regiões.  Pesquisa 
Agropecuária Brasileira 33: 1703-1717. 

Silva  S.S.P.  &  Peracchi  A.  L.  1999.Visits  of  bats 

to  flowers  of  Lafoensia  glyptocarpa  Koehne 
(Lythraceae). Revista Brasileira de Biologia 59: 
19-22. 

Teixeira  R.;  Correa  C.  &  Fischer  E.A.  2009. 

Frugivory 

by 

Artibeus 

jamaicensis 

(Phyllostomidae)  bats  in  the  Pantanal,  Brazil. 
Studies on Neotropical Fauna and Environment 
44: 7-15.  

Terborgh J. 1986.  Keystone plant resources in the 

Tropical  Forest.  In:  Conservation  Biology:  the 
science of society and diversity (edited by Soulé 
M.E.), pp. 330-344. Sinaeur, New York.  

Tomas  W.M.;  Ishii  I.H.;  Strussmann  C.;  Nunes 

A.P.;  Salis  S.M.;  Campos  Z.M.;  Ferreira  V.L.; 
Bordignon M.O. & Padilha D.R.C. 2010. Borda 
Oeste  do  Pantanal  e  Maciço  do  Urucum  em 
Corumbá, 

MS: 

Área 

prioritária 

para 

conservação da biodiversidade, pp. 1-6. Editora 
Embrapa, Brasília.   

Uieda W. & Vasconcellos-Neto J. 1985. Dispersão 

de Solanum spp. (Solanaceae) por morcegos, na 
região  de  Manaus,  AM,  Brasil.  Revista 
Brasileira de Zoologia 2: 449-458. 

Van  Der  Pijl  L.  1957.  The  dispersal  of  plants  by 

bats 

(Chiropterochory). 

Acta 

Botanica 

Neerlandica 6: 291-315. 

Vizotto  L.D.  &  Taddei  V.A.  1973.  Chave  para 

determinação 

de 

quirópteros 

brasileiros. 

Boletim de Ciências 1: 1-72.   

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.





Chiroptera Neotropical
 
Universidade de Brasília
Campus Darcy Ribeiro
Instituto de Ciências Biológicas - Departamento de Zoologia
CEP: 70910-900 - Brasilia - DF
Tel: (+55 61) 3107-2915
Fax: (+55 61) 3107-2922
 
chiropteraneotropical@gmail.com
http://chiropteraneotropical.net.