/work/vetindex/tasks/simple_ojs_harvester/journals/full_text-html.html
background image

Chiroptera Neotropical 2015 - 21(2): 1338-1341 

1338 

Report of Peter’s ghost faced bat Mormoops megalophylla fossils from the 

island of Barbuda, Lesser Antilles 

 

Johanset Orihuela

1,*

 & Adrian Tejedor

 

1

 Department of Earth and Environment - Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199. 

2

 Resident Lecturer in Tropical Ecology, the School for Field Studies, Villa Carmen, Peru. 

 

* Corresponding author: paleonycteris@gmail.com 
 

SHORT COMMUNICATION 
Manuscript history: 
Submitted in 24/Jun/2015 
Accepted in 30/Dec/2015 
Available on line in 31/Dec/2015 
Section editor: Monik Oprea
 

 
 

Abstract.  This  note  reports  Peter’s  ghost  faced  bat  Mormoops 
megalophylla
  from  the  island  of  Barbuda,  northern  Lesser  Antilles. 
Our  record  is  based  on  fossil  remains  recently  discovered  in 
uncatalogued  material  or  misidentified  specimens  within  a  late 
Quaternary  assemblage  collected  at  Caves  1  and  2,  Two-Foot  Bay, 
Barbuda,  over  50  years  ago  and  housed  at  the  Vertebrate 
Paleontology  collection  at  the  University  of  Florida,  Florida,  USA. 
This is an extralimital record for M. megalophylla, which extends its 
past distribution well into the northern Lesser Antilles, increasing the 
bat  diversity  and  number  of  extinct  species  known  from  this  island 
during the Quaternary.   
 
Keywords:  Bat,  Mormoops,  Barbuda,  Lesser  Antilles,  Extinction, 
Extirpation 

All Chiroptera Neotropical content can be freely accessed at www.chiroptera.unb.br. ISSN 2317-6105 (online) | 1413-4403 (printed) 

Peter’s 

ghost 

faced 

bat 

Mormoops 

megalophylla  (Peters,  1864)  is  endemic  to  the 
New  World,  where  it  is  widespread  from 
southeastern  US  throughout  Mexico  and  part  of 
Central  America.  It  seems  absent  in  Nicaragua, 
Costa  Rica,  and  Panama  (Smith,  1972;  Rezsutek 
and  Cameron,  1993).  In  South  America,  it  is 
present  in  Ecuador,  northwest  Peru,  northern 
Colombia, 

northern 

Venezuela 

including 

Margarita  Island,  the  islands  of  Aruba,  Curaçao, 
Bonaire (Netherlands Antilles), plus Trinidad and 
Tobago (Smith, 1972; Simmons, 2005).  

Fossil  remains  of  Mormoops  megalophylla 

provide  wide  extralimital  records  for  this  species 
in  the  Caribbean  during  the  Quaternary.  These 
include  occurrences  in  the  islands  of  Cuba, 
Bahamas,  Hispaniola,  and  Jamaica  in  the  Greater 
Antilles, where M. megalophylla is now extirpated 
(Silva,  1974;  Morgan,  2001;  Morgan  and 
Czaplewski,  2012).    Fossils  of  Mormoops 
megalophylla
  are  also  reported  from  Curaçao, 
Aruba,  Margarita  and  Tobago  in  the  Lesser 
Antilles,  Florida  (USA),  and  northeastern  Brazil 
(Rezsutek  and  Cameron,  1993;  Czaplewski  and 
Cartelle,  1998;  Morgan,  2001;  Dávalos,  2006; 
Morgan  and  Czaplewski,  2012).  Such  former, 
wider distribution of this and other species seems 
to  have  lasted  until  the  late  Holocene  in  Cuba 
(Orihuela, 2010; Orihuela and Tejedor, 2012).  

This  note  reports  fossil  specimens  of 

Mormoops  megalophylla  from  the  island  of 
Barbuda,  in  the  Lesser  Antilles.  This  note  is 
relevant  because  it  expands  the  extralimital 
distribution  of  Mormoops  megalophylla  in  the 

Caribbean,  and  increases  the  tally  of  locally 
extinct bat fauna in the Lesser Antilles. Moreover, 
it provides a new fossil bat record for the island of 
Barbuda  that  may  suggest  sympatry  between 
Mormoops  blainvillei  Leach  1821  and  M. 
megalophylla,
  and  a  higher  bat  diversity  in  this 
island during the late Quaternary. 

The specimens were discovered accidentally in 

the  vertebrate  paleontology  collection  of  the 
Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville, 
Florida  (UF-FLMNH)  (USA)  while  researching 
Antillean  fossil  bats  in  2004  (Fig.  1  and  2).  We 
included four of these specimens in our study of a 
pre-Columbian  M.  megalophylla  dentary  from 
Cuba,  but  did  not  provide  a  formal  report  and 
description  of  the  specimens  or  further 
contextualization  of  their  presence  in  the  UF-
FLMNH  collection  (Orihuela  and  Tejedor,  2012: 
Fig. 2 D, E, and F). In addition to these specimens, 
one  possible  M.  megalophylla  specimen  is 
included  here,  but  without  number  sharing  a  vial 
with  a  fossil  M.  blainvillei  (UF3376)  from  Little 
Bay Cave I in the island of Anguilla and collected 
by  W.  Auffenberg  and  F.  Wayne  King  on  July 
1958. Because the catalog indicates that only one 
specimen  should  be  in  the  vial,  the  origin  of  the 
unnumbered  specimen  is  unknown.  Thus,  we 
consider this specimen as a possible record but do 
not  include  it  further  here  until  more  information 
is  available  (unpubl.  data).  Lineal  measurements 
were taken with a digital caliper and are reported 
in millimeters (mm). 

We  found  the  first  specimens  within  a  small 

cardboard  box  with  the  inscription  “Two-Foot 

/work/vetindex/tasks/simple_ojs_harvester/journals/full_text-html.html
background image

Orihuela & Tejedor | Chiroptera Neotropical 2015 - 21(2): 1338-1341 

1339 

Bay,  Cave  II-I,  Barbuda”  in  pencil,  and  included 
three  fossil  Mormoops  megalophylla  dentaries 
(UF2811,  3380,  and  3381)  along  with  a  right 
dentary of Mormoops blainvillei. This specimen of 
M.  blainvillei  is  within  the  same  vial  of  M. 
megalophylla
  UF3381,  and  is  marked  3371  in 
pencil.  Both  specimens  are  dark-chestnut  brown 
color.  The  online  catalog  indicates  that  Walter 
Auffenberg  and  F.  Wayne  King  collected  the 
specimens  from  Cave  II  Two  Foot  Bay  (lat. 
17.668565 N, -61.769578 W), in northern Barbuda 
on  July  1958.  A  study  of  other  specimens  in  the 
same collection, but collected in other localities in 
Barbuda,  also  revealed  the  presence  of 
uncatalogued 

M. 

megalophylla

These 

assemblages  are  assumed  to  date  to  the  late 
Pleistocene and Holocene (Pregill, et al., 1994). 

These first three specimens were distinguished 

from  M.  blainvillei  based  on  size,  of  which 
Mormoops  megalophylla  is  significantly  larger 
(see  Table  1;  Fig.  1-2).  Few  discrete  characters 
served  to  help  identify  between  these  taxa.  The 
angular process of M. megalophylla is in line with 
the  dentary  ramus,  whereas  that  of  M.  blainvillei 
curves laterally, away from the line of the dentary 
ramus  (Silva,  1983).  The  angle  between  the 
horizontal  axis  of  the  dentary  and  the  coronoid-
condyle  crest  is  more  inclined  towards  the  tooth 
row  in  Mormoops  blainvillei  than  in  M. 

megalophylla. The width of the p4 has also 
been  used  for  identification,  where  M. 
blainvillei
 generally has a broader posterior 
half  than  anterior  half  of  the  tooth. 
However,  all  these  characters,  except  for 
size,  vary  among  the  species  (Ray  et  al., 
1963), and were not used by Simmons and 
Conway  (2001).  The  M.  megalophylla 
fossils  from  Barbuda  fall  within  the  size 
range of M. m. intermedia (Miller, 1900) an 
insular  subspecies  of  the  Netherland 
Antilles,  and  are  smaller  than  the 
continental  M.  m.  megalophylla  and  M.  m. 
tumidiceps
 Miller 1902 (Table 1). 

It seems probable that these fossils were 

erroneously  lumped  together  as  Mormoops 
blainvillei
, for they are identified as such in 
the  UF-FLMNH  online  catalog  and 
individual  vials.  The  Antigua  and  Barbuda 
collection  include  other  mormoopid  fossils 
from Cave I under M. blainvillei that are M. 
megalophylla
  (e.g.,  partial  mandibles 
UF4243-4258  from  Cave  I  collected  by 
Walter  Auffenberg  in  March  1962),  in 

 

Figure 1. Fossil Mormoops spp. dentaries from Cave 1-2, Two Foot Bay, island of Barbuda, Lesser Antilles. 
FLMNH (UF) 2811, 3380 and 3381 are Mormoops megalophylla, and UF3371 (?) Mormoops blainvillei.  

 

Figure  1.  Fossil  Mormoops  spp.  Dentaries  from  Cave  1-2, 
Two  Foot  Bay,  island  of  Barbuda,  Lesser  Antilles.  FLMNH 
(UF)  2811,  3380  and  3381  are  Mormoops  megalophylla,  and 
UF3371 Mormoops blainvillei.  

/work/vetindex/tasks/simple_ojs_harvester/journals/full_text-html.html
background image

Orihuela & Tejedor | Chiroptera Neotropical 2015 - 21(2): 1338-1341 

1340 

addition  to  uncatalogued  M.  megalophylla.  The 
online  catalog  and  individual  vials  of  numbered 
specimens  reflect  the  misidentification  of  the  M. 
megalophylla
 for M. blainvillei.  

Two-Foot  Bay  noncultural  cave  deposits  in 

Barbuda  have  provided  some  of  the  richest  fossil 
faunas of the Lesser Antilles (Pregill et al., 1994). 
Despite  such  overall  richness  of  the  vertebrate 
fossil  record  of  both  Antigua  and  Barbuda,  only 
one fossil bat, Mormoops blainvillei, was reported 
from  Barbuda  (Pregill  et  al.,  1994:  43;  Morgan, 
2001).  Several  researchers  mentioned mormoopid 
fossils  from  Quaternary  cave  deposits  in  these 
islands (Steadman et al., 1984; Pregill et al. 1988, 
1994; Morgan, 2001: 383; Genoways et al., 2007; 
Pedersen  et  al.,  2007;  and  Morgan  and 
Czaplewski,  2012:  130),  but  these  pertain  to  M. 
blainvillei  
(Pregill  et  al.,  1994:43).  Mormoops 
megalophylla
  was  unreported  from  either  island 
until  now.    These  findings  are  not  unexpected 
given  that  part  of  these  collections  remain 
uncatalogued  and  unstudied  (Pregill  et  al.,  1994: 
16; Morgan, 2001: 383). 

This  finding  increases  the  known  fossil  bat 

fauna  from  Barbuda,  indicating  a  richer  bat 
paleofauna in the island during the Quaternary that 
still require further attention and study, especially 
a  working  chronology  that  can  contextualize  bat 
extirpations  and  extinctions  in  time.  So  far,  five 
extant bats (Pedersen et al., 2006, 2007), and now 
one  more  locally  extinct  form  is  reported  from 
Barbuda, a rich fauna considering the small size of 
the  island.    Moreover,  the  occurrence  of 
Mormoops 

blainvillei 

and 

Mormoops 

megalophylla  on  the  same  deposit,  if  truly 
contemporaneous, 

provides 

and 

additional 

example of mormoopid richness and sympatry on 
the  same  archipelago  during  the  late  Quaternary. 
However,  as  is  usually  the  case  of  cave  deposits, 
the  multiple  sources  of  cave  sedimentation  often 
result  in  poorly  stratified  or  non-stratified 
deposits.  Discerning  the  contemporaneity  of 
individual  specimens  within  these  deposits, 
especially  if  stratigraphically  undated,  is 
problematic.  Semken  et  al.  (2010)  revealed  that 
individual  specimens  found  associated  within  a 
given deposit are unlikely to be contemporaneous 

with  each  another  in  case  studies  from  North 
American caves.  Thus, taxa within such deposits 
should then be assumed as non-contemporaneous, 
unless  absolute  dating  can  indicate  otherwise 
(Czaplewski persn. comm., April 2015). 

Findings like these indicate that much is yet to 

be discovered and learned from fossil micro fauna 
deposited  in  the  multiple  caves  of  the  Caribbean 
islands. No doubt, further discovery, analysis and 
dating of fossil deposits in the Lesser Antilles will 
greatly  enhance  the  overall  understanding  of  bat 
extinctions and aid designing conservation efforts 
for bat communities in the West Indies.  

Acknowledgments 

We thank Richard Hulbert Jr. for access to the 

collection  and  guidance  therein.  Herman  Benitez 
for  financial  support.  More  especially,  we  thank 
Nick  Czaplewski,  Gilberto  Silva  Taboada,  and 
Tamara Castaño for providing critical discussions 
or reviews during the early drafts.  

 

References 
Czaplewski,  N.  J.,  and  C.  Cartelle.  1998. 

Pleistocene  bats  from  cave  deposits  in  Bahia, 
Brazil. Journal of Mammalogy 79: 784–803. 

Dávalos,  L.  M.  2006.  The  geography  of 

diversification  in  the  mormoopids  (Chiroptera: 
Mormoopidae).  Biological  Journal  of  the 
Linnaean Society 88: 101–118.  

Genoways, H., C. J. Phillips, S. C. Pedersen, and 

L. K. Gordon. 2007. Bats of Anguilla, Northern 
Lesser  Antilles.  Occasional  Papers  of  the 
Museum of Texas Tech University 270: 11p.  

Morgan, G. S. 2001. Patterns of extinction in West 

Indian  bats.  In:  Biogeography  of  the  West 
Indies: Patters and Perspectives (edited by C. A. 
Woods  and  F.  E.  Sergile),  pp  369–407.  CRC 
Press, Boca Raton. 

Morgan,  G.  S.,  and  N.  J.  Czaplewski.  2012. 

Evolutionary  history  of  the  Neotropical 
Chiroptera:  the  fossil  record.  In:  Evolutionary 
History of Bats (edited by G. F. Gunnell and N. 
B.  Simmons),  pp  105–161.  Cambridge 
University Press, Cambridge.  

Table 1. Mandibular measurements in mm of neontological and fossil Mormoops megalophylla, including subspecies 
M. m. intermediaM. m. megalophyllaM. m. tumidiceps, with the specimens from Barbuda reported here (UF2811, 
3380-81, 3371?). Lineal measurements for Mormoops blainvillei are from Silva (1974 and 1983), and Anthony (1918) 
merged with modern specimens from La Pluma cave (n=9) (Cave of the Feather) in northern Matanzas, Cuba. Other 
measurements are from Orihuela and Tejedor (2012), and the cited literature therein. 

 

Measurements (mm)

Mormoops megalophylla

Mormoops blainvillei

UF2811 UF3380 3381

n

X ± SD

Range

UF3371?

n

X ± SD

Range

Total max. length

12.45

12.58

55

12.86 ± 0.5 11.8-13.52

11.72

73

11.8 ± 0.3 11.0-12.19

Min. toothrow length (i1-m3)

8.37

8.7

8.56

28

8.74 ± 0.3

8.28-9.2

8.25

9

8.21 ± 0.07

8.1-8.31

Min. length from canine to last molar

8.06

8.6

8

13

8.31 ± 0.2

7.88-8.63

7.83

73

7.84  ± 0.3 7.28-8.30

Depth of coronoid

5.08

4.76

13

4.93 ± 0.3

4.59-5.43

9

4.97  ±  0.3

4.5-5.29

Height of the ramus at pm4

2.04

1.94

2.4

13

1.91 ± 0.3

1.52-2.1

1.63

8

1.49 ± 0.1

1.29-1.64

/work/vetindex/tasks/simple_ojs_harvester/journals/full_text-html.html
background image

Orihuela & Tejedor | Chiroptera Neotropical 2015 - 21(2): 1338-1341 

1341 

Orihuela,  J.  2010.  Late  Holocene  Fauna  from  a 

Cave Deposit in Western Cuba: post-Columbian 
occurrence  of  the  Vampire  Bat  Desmodus 
rotundus
  (Phyllostomidae:  Desmodontinae). 
Caribbean Journal of Science 46(2/3): 297–312.  

Orihuela, J., and A. Tejedor. 2012. Peter’s ghost-

faced  bat  Mormoops  megalophylla  (Chiroptera: 
Mormoopidae) 

from 

pre-Columbian 

archeological 

deposit 

in 

Cuba. 

Acta 

Chiropterologica 14(1): 63–72.  

Pedersen, S. C., P. A. Larsen, H. H. Genoways, K. 

Lindsay, R. Adams, V. J. Swier, J. Appino, and 
M.  Morton.  2006.  Bats  of  Antigua,  Northern 
Lesser  Antilles.  Occasional  Papers  of  the 
Museum of Texas Tech University 249: 19p.  

Pedersen, S. C., P. A. Larsen, H. H. Genoways, M. 

N.  Morton,  K.  Lindsay,  and  J.  Cindric.  2007. 
Bats  of  Barbuda,  Northern  Lesser  Antilles. 
Occasional  Papers  of  the  Museum  of  Texas 
Tech University 271: 18p.  

Pregill, G. K., D. W. Steadman, S. L. Olson, and 

F.  V.  Grady.  1988.  Late  Holocene  fossil 
vertebrates from Burma Quarry, Antigua Lesser 
Antilles.  Smithsonian  Contribution  to  Zoology 
463: 1–27.  

Pregill,  G.  K.,  D.  W.  Steadman,  and  D.  R. 

Watters.  1994.  Late  Quaternary  vertebrate 
faunas  of  the  Lesser  Antilles:  historical 
components  of  Caribbean  biogeography. 
Bulletin  of  the  Carnegie  Museum  of  Natural 
History 30: 1–51.  

Ray,  C.  E.,  S.  J.  Olsen,  and  H.  James  Gut.  1963. 

Three mammals new to the Pleistocene fauna of 
Florida,  and  a  reconsideration  of  five  earlier 
records.  Journal  of  Mammalogy  44(3):  373–
395.  

Rezsutek,  M.,  and  G.  N.  Cameron.  1993. 

Mormoops  megalophylla.  Mammalian  Species 
448: 1–5.  

Semken,  H.  A.  Jr.,  R.  W.  Graham,  and  T.  W. 

Stafford  Jr.  2010.  AMS14C  analysis  of  Late 
Pleistocene  non-analog  faunal  component  from 
21 cave deposits in southeastern North America. 
Quaternary International 217: 240–255.  

Silva  Taboada,  G.  1974.  Fossil  chiroptera  from 

cave deposits in central Cuba, with descriptions 
of  two  new  species  (genera  Pteronotus  and 
Mormoops)  and  the  first  West  Indian  record  of 
Mormoops  megalophylla.  Acta  Zoologica 
Cracoviensia 19: 34–73.  

Silva  Taboada,  G.  1983.  Los  Murciélagos  de 

Cuba. Editorial Científico–Técnica, La Habana.  

Simmons,  N.  B.  2005.  Order  Chiroptera.  In: 

Mammal  Species  of  the  World:  A  Taxonomic 
and  Geographic  Reference  (edited  by  D.  E. 
Wilson  and  D.  M.  Reeder),  pp.  312–529.  John 
Hopkins University Press, Baltimore.  

Simmons,  N.  B.,  and  T.  N.  Conway.  2001. 

Phylogenetic relationships of mormoopid bats 

(Chiroptera: 

Mormoopidae) 

based 

on 

morphological data. Bulletin of the American 

Museum of Natural History, 258: 97pp.  
Smith,  J.  D.  1972.  Systematics  of  the  chiropteran 

family Mormoopidae. University of 

Kansas Museum of Natural History Miscellaneous 

Publication 56: 1–132. 

Steadman, D. W., G. K. Pregill, and S. L. Olson. 

1984. Fossil vertebrates from Antigua,  

Lesser  Antilles:  evidence  for  late  Holocene 

human-caused  extinctions  in  the  West  Indies. 
Proceedings  of  the  National  Academy  of 
Science 81: 4448–4451. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.





Chiroptera Neotropical
 
Universidade de Brasília
Campus Darcy Ribeiro
Instituto de Ciências Biológicas - Departamento de Zoologia
CEP: 70910-900 - Brasilia - DF
Tel: (+55 61) 3107-2915
Fax: (+55 61) 3107-2922
 
chiropteraneotropical@gmail.com
http://chiropteraneotropical.net.